ASBESTOS IN THE HOME
WHERE ASBESTOS HAZARDS MAY BE FOUND IN THE HOME?

Some roofing and siding shingles are made of asbestos cement.

Houses built between 1930 and 1950 may have asbestos as insulation.

Asbestos may be present in textured paint and patching compounds used on wall and ceiling joints. Their use was banned in 1977.

Artificial ashes and embers sold for use in gas-fired fireplaces may contain asbestos.

Older products such as stove-top pads may have some asbestos compounds.

Walls and floors around woodburning stoves may be protected with asbestos paper, millboard, or cement sheets.

Asbestos is found in some vinyl floor tiles and the backing on vinyl sheet flooring and adhesives.

Hot water and steam pipes in older houses may be coated with an asbestos material or covered with an asbestos blanket or tape.

Oil and coal furnaces and door gaskets may have asbestos insulation.

WHAT SHOULD BE DONE ABOUT ASBESTOS IN THE HOME?
If you think that asbestos may be in your home, do not panic! Usually , the best thing is to leave asbestos material that is in good condition ALONE. Asbestos material in good condition will not release asbestos fibers. THERE IS NO DANGER unless fibers are released and inhaled into the lungs.
If asbestos material is more than slightly damaged, or if you are going to make changes in your home that might disturb it, repair or removal by a professional is needed. Before you have your home remodeled, find out whether asbestos materials are present.

ASBESTOS PROFESSIONALS.
Asbestos professionals can conduct home inspections, take samples of suspected material, assess its condition, and advise about what corrections are needed and who is qualified to make these corrections.

Some firms offer combinations of testing, assessment, and correction. A professional hired to assess the need for corrective action should not be connected with an asbestos-correction firm. It is better to use two different firms so there is no conflict of interest.

It is recommended that you ask asbestos professionals to document their completion of federal or state-approved training. Each person performing work in your home should provide proof of training and licensing in asbestos work, such as completion of EPA-approved training. State and local health departments or EPA regional offices may have listings of licensed professionals in your area.

In addition to general asbestos contractors, you may select a roofing, flooring, or plumbing contractor trained to handle asbestos when it is necessary to remove and replace roofing, flooring, siding, or asbestos-cement pipe that is part of a water system. Normally, roofing and flooring contractors are exempt from state and local licensing requirements.

ASBESTOS DO’S AND DON’TS FOR THE HOMEOWNER.
DO keep activities to a minimum in any areas having damaged material containing asbestos.
DO take every precaution to avoid damaging asbestos material.
DO have removal and repairs done by people trained and qualified in handling asbestos.
DON’T dust, sweep, or vacuum debris that may contain asbestos.
DON’T saw, sand, scrape, or drill holes in asbestos material.
DON’T track material that could contain asbestos through the house.
CAUTION !
Do not dust, sweep, or vacuum debris that may contain asbestos. These steps will disturb tiny asbestos fibers and may release them into the air. Remove dust by wet mopping or with a special HEPA vacuum cleaner used by trained asbestos contractors.

 


 

 

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